A few good links to share…

A UCLA scientist is using tiny worms – C. elegans – in a high-throughput, automated format, to screen chemicals for reproductive toxicity.

Patrick-Allard-Lab-0841_mid_credit-UCLA Fielding SPH

Patrick Allard (photo credit: UCLA Fielding School of Public Health)

“With this approach we can now simultaneously screen hundreds of compounds for their toxicity to the reproductive process, which can help to prioritize the chemicals that need further analysis,” Allard said. “Beyond that, once we find compounds that are repro-toxic, we can look further into the stages of reproduction that are affected, and how they are affected.”

Organovo's Novogen 3D bioprinter (photo credit: Organovo)

Organovo’s Novogen 3D bioprinter (photo credit: Organovo)

Chemistry World has a good overview of the growing skin 3D-bioprinting industry, noting that while the initial push is coming from cosmetics companies, “The expertise gained could feed into pharmaceutical research, and even help enable patients’ own cells to be made into almost perfectly compatible skin grafts and eventually replacement organs.”

And in the NIH Director’s Blog, Francis Collins describes NIH-funded efforts to develop neural tissue chips that predict neurotoxicity:

Cultivated neural tissue (photo credit: Michael Schwartz, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Cultivated neural tissue (photo credit: Michael Schwartz, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Each cultured 3D “organoid”—which sits comfortably in the bottom of a pea-sized well on a standard laboratory plate—comes complete with its very own neurons, support cells, blood vessels, and immune cells! As described in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [2], this new tool is poised to predict earlier, faster, and less expensively which new or untested compounds—be they drug candidates or even ingredients in cosmetics and pesticides—might harm the brain, particularly at the earliest stages of development.

Collins also co-authored a Nature commentary summarizing six important lessons learned from Human Genome Project, on its 25th anniversary: embrace partnerships, maximize data-sharing, plan for data analysis, prioritize technology development, address the societal implications of advances, be audacious yet flexible… Read the details here.