We’re proud to announce that we are the recipients of the prestigious Lush Prize award for training in recognition of our efforts to replace animal testing with alternatives.

The prize was awarded to the Human Toxicology Project Consortium (HTPC), in recognition of a training program we developed that helps scientists apply alternative methods. The HTPC is a coalition of corporate and non-profit organizations, founded and coordinated by The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), that promotes the development & implementation of non-animal science to improve chemical safety tests. As part of our training program, earlier this year we created a course to promote the concept and application of Adverse Outcome Pathways, or AOPs. An AOP is a flexible framework that describes the events that occur following chemical exposure. The course trains scientists to use a software package that allows them to organize and combine biological information. When organized this way, the information helps scientists predict what will happen after chemical exposure, as an alternative to testing that chemical on animals. The course was developed by the HTPC and etioLogic Consulting Services, in collaboration with an international group of scientists, and has been incorporated into the training materials of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

Dr. Catherine Willett, Director of Regulatory Toxicology, Risk Assessment and Alternatives for The HSUS will accept the award at a ceremony in London this evening.

Lush Prize is a joint project between Lush Cosmetics and the Ethical Consumer Research Association (ECRA) and was founded in 2012 as a way of supporting initiatives to replace the use of animals in research. Prizes are awarded annually in Lobbying, Public Awareness, Science, Training, and Young Researchers, and each winner is awarded £50,000 (around $65,000). This year, more than 66 entries from 29 countries were submitted.

The prize money we receive will be used to continue our work to advance non-animal methods in research and testing.