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Human Toxicology Project Consortium at the Society of Toxicology meeting in New Orleans

You’ll find the Human Toxicology Project Consortium at the Society of Toxicology’s annual meeting in New Orleans next week – in the ToxExpo center, poster sessions, workshops, and seminars.

  • Visit HTPC’s informational booth at ToxExpo, booth #1704.
  • HTPC is co-sponsoring a “hands-on” seminar, “Creating an Adverse Outcome Pathway in the AOP Wiki,” on Tuesday, March 15, from 5-7PM in the Hilton Riverside.  More details about the seminar can be found here.
  • HTPC is also once again co-sponsoring and presenting at the annual SOT Satellite Meeting, Updates on Activities Related to 21st Century Toxicology and Related Efforts: Invited Presentations and Open Microphone, on Thursday, March 17, 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Jefferson Ballroom. As always, this informative meeting features a number of invited presentations, and also allows time for an “open microphone” segment in which participants are welcome to give brief presentations on germane topics.

The draft program is as follows:

12:30 PM—Box Lunch (for pre-registered participants) and Welcome by Thomas Hartung, Johns Hopkins University

1:00 PM—Invited Speakers (10 minute presentations each followed by 5 minute of discussion)

ToxCast Update: Russell Thomas, US Environmental Protection Agency

EDSP21 Update: David Dix, US Environmental Protection Agency

Tox21 Update: Richard Paules, US National Toxicology Program

Hamner TT21C Update: Melvin Andersen, Hamner Institutes

NICEATM Update: Warren Casey, NICEATM

SEURAT/EU Tox-Risk Update: Michael Schwarz, University of Tuebingen

CAAT’s Read-Across Initiative and Human Toxome-Related Activity Update: Thomas Hartung, Johns Hopkins

Human Toxicology Project Consortium Update: Catherine Willett, HTPC

Evidence-Based Toxicology Update: Martin Stephens, Johns Hopkins

3:15 PM—Open Microphone for Additional Presentations and Discussion

4:00 PM—Adjourn

  • Kate Willett will also present a poster in the Regulation and Policy session, Wednesday, March 16, 1:15 PM to 4:45 PM: “Regulatory Acceptance of Non-standard Toxicological Methods through Increased use of Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessment (IATA)” (Abstract #3003/Poster #P143).

Corporate members and partners of HTPC will be presenting at SOT next week, as well.  Scientists from each of the member corporations are coauthors on the following posters:

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Educational Infographic produced by the Human Toxicology Project Consortium

THE FUTURE OF TOXICITY TESTINGHTP_infographic_FINAL_revised

A new infographic produced by the Human Toxicology Project Consortium shows in three sections how the future of toxicity testing promises a steady reduction in testing costs, increases in human relevance and confidence in safety assessments, and the eventual elimination of animal tests.

The first section provides a snapshot comparison of the current and future costs, efficiency and efficacy of toxicity testing, while the mid portion uses pesticide testing as a specific example of now, vs near-future, vs the optimal approach that, given the focus and resources necessary, will be envisioned within the decade.

The near-future and optimal approaches rely increasingly on our understanding of biology and using it to build a predictive systems biology platform that is comprised of an interrelated network of biological pathways. This platform is used to design and interpret tests that provide much more efficient and effective characterization of chemical activity that can be used to predict safe use of chemicals.

Finally, the results of this progression are captured in the summary graphic at the end – decreasing costs, animal use and time while human relevance and our confidence in safety decisions continue to improve.

As explained on our Project page, the Human Toxicology Project Consortium works on three areas critical for the successful, international implementation of a pathways-based approach to chemical safety testing: advancing the science, communicating the purpose and goals of pathway-based toxicology, and lobbying for funding and policy changes that will support pathway-based approaches in the US and around the world.

To advance our communication and education efforts, HTPC member organizations worked together to create this infographic, to quickly and effectively illustrate the differences between traditional animal-based toxicity testing and pathway-based testing in terms of predictive power, cost, and testing capacity.

Details on the numbers used in this comparison are available here (PDF).

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HTPC member Unilever partners with the EPA to develop non-animal approaches to safety testing

Human Toxicology Project Consortium member Unilever announced Tuesday that it will be collaborating with the US Environmental Protection Agency on a project that will improve and advance human-relevant chemical safety assessment while phasing out the use of animals.

The project will create case studies around chemicals of mutual interest, using existing data from the Toxcast and Tox21 programs combined with Unilever’s data and methods for estimating consumer exposures, and testing new high-throughput screening methods that account for metabolism and more completely assess human biological pathways.

Quoted in the joint press release, Russell Thomas, Director of EPA’s National Center for Computational Toxicology, said that if the project is successful, “research from this collaboration will result in better ways to evaluate the potential human health effects of new ingredients and chemicals we currently know little about. …These methods could be used by both industry and governmental agencies to reduce the costs associated with safety testing and accelerate the pace of chemical risk assessment.” And Julia Fentem, Vice President of Unilever’s Safety and Environmental Assurance Centre, said, “This research collaboration is strategically very important for Unilever’s long-held ambition to eliminate the need for any animal testing while also continuing to ensure the safety of consumers and our environment. If we had robust scientific tools to accurately and rapidly predict exposures to chemicals at the cellular and molecular levels within the human body, this would be a huge step forward in being able to conduct safety risk assessments without using animal data.”

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EPA expanding use of non-animal methods

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EPA’s Tox21 high-throughput chemical screening robot (image attribution)

Last month, the EPA invited stakeholder comments on its proposed new guidance for testing pesticides for acute oral, dermal, and inhalation toxicity, as well as skin and eye irritation and skin sensitization.  The draft guidance outlines a procedure for expanding the use of alternative test methods in pesticide testing.  If implemented, the guidance stands to improve chemical screening efficiency and data relevance while greatly reducing the agency’s use of animals.  As the EPA press release acknowledges, “With the rapid advances in science and continual development of new technologies… there is an increasing potential for the use of alternative methods in regulatory risk assessments.”  The draft guidance is available here: http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/science/draft-alternative-test-method-guidance.pdf  Comments are due to Christopher Schlosser (schlosser.christopher@epa.gov) by March 10.

As the press release also notes, the draft guidance represents continued progress in the agency’s efforts to adopt recommendations in the National Academy of Science’s report, Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century. For more about these achievements, see these two recent EPA blog posts:

Exposing the Missing Link: Advancing Exposure Science to Rapidly Evaluate Chemicals

EPA: Taking Action on Toxics and Chemical Safety

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Advancing Species Extrapolation: EPA’s “Sequence Alignment to Predict Across Species Susceptibility” | Science

…SeqAPASS provides us with a fast, efficient screening tool. Using it, we can begin to extrapolate toxicity information from a few model organisms (like mice, rats, zebrafish, etc.) to thousands of other non-target species to evaluate potential chemical susceptibility.

SeqAPASS provides an example of how EPA Chemical Safety for Sustainability researchers are leading the effort to usher in a new generation of toxicology practices that aspire to reduce the number of animals used, decrease costs, and increase the efficiency of chemical toxicity testing. The 21st century chemical toxicity testing strategy incorporates these ideals and has given rise to adverse outcome pathway (AOP) development and rapid, high-throughput chemical screening programs such as EPA’s ToxCast program.

Read more on the EPA’s science blog: Advancing Species Extrapolation: EPA’s “Sequence Alignment to Predict Across Species Susceptibility” | Science.

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OECD launches the AOP Knowledge Base

The OECD, along with the US Environmental Protection Agency and the European Commission Joint Research Centre, today announced the public release of the Adverse Outcome Pathway Knowledge Base.  The web-based platform is designed to consolidate all existing information on the mechanisms and pathways through which chemicals can cause or contribute to adverse effects.  The first available module is the AOP Wiki, an online, interactive encyclopedia for AOP development.  From the OECD press release:

“All stakeholders from academia, governmental agencies and the chemical industry are invited to use the wiki either as a source of information, or as active contributors posting comments and content. This expert contribution from third-parties is strongly encouraged since it is through such “crowd sourcing” that the AOP KB will ultimately evolve.”

At the annual meeting of the Society of Toxicology in Phoenix earlier this year, HTPC co-sponsored several AOP Knowledge Base “Stakeholder Input Sessions” designed to gather ideas from potential users about the features and information they would find most essential in these tools.  That process is ongoing.  As noted in the OECD press release,

“By opting for this early public release, the OECD aims to familiarise interested parties with AOP concepts and terminology through interaction with the AOP Wiki, with the hope of engaging as many potential AOP developers and contributors as possible.”

The AOP Knowledge Base is a key component of the comprehensive AOP Development Program launched by the OECD in 2012.

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“Ushering In a New Generation of Chemical Screening”

ToxCast-Robotic-ArmOn the EPA’s “Science” blog, Dr. Richard Judson explains how the agency is using automated chemical screening processes in its Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program:

Ushering In a New Generation of Chemical Screening | Science.

 

 

 

Photo: National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) ultra-high-throughput robotic screening system

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