Human Toxicology Project Consortium at the Society of Toxicology meeting in New Orleans

You’ll find the Human Toxicology Project Consortium at the Society of Toxicology’s annual meeting in New Orleans next week – in the ToxExpo center, poster sessions, workshops, and seminars.

  • Visit HTPC’s informational booth at ToxExpo, booth #1704.
  • HTPC is co-sponsoring a “hands-on” seminar, “Creating an Adverse Outcome Pathway in the AOP Wiki,” on Tuesday, March 15, from 5-7PM in the Hilton Riverside.  More details about the seminar can be found here.
  • HTPC is also once again co-sponsoring and presenting at the annual SOT Satellite Meeting, Updates on Activities Related to 21st Century Toxicology and Related Efforts: Invited Presentations and Open Microphone, on Thursday, March 17, 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Jefferson Ballroom. As always, this informative meeting features a number of invited presentations, and also allows time for an “open microphone” segment in which participants are welcome to give brief presentations on germane topics.

The draft program is as follows:

12:30 PM—Box Lunch (for pre-registered participants) and Welcome by Thomas Hartung, Johns Hopkins University

1:00 PM—Invited Speakers (10 minute presentations each followed by 5 minute of discussion)

ToxCast Update: Russell Thomas, US Environmental Protection Agency

EDSP21 Update: David Dix, US Environmental Protection Agency

Tox21 Update: Richard Paules, US National Toxicology Program

Hamner TT21C Update: Melvin Andersen, Hamner Institutes

NICEATM Update: Warren Casey, NICEATM

SEURAT/EU Tox-Risk Update: Michael Schwarz, University of Tuebingen

CAAT’s Read-Across Initiative and Human Toxome-Related Activity Update: Thomas Hartung, Johns Hopkins

Human Toxicology Project Consortium Update: Catherine Willett, HTPC

Evidence-Based Toxicology Update: Martin Stephens, Johns Hopkins

3:15 PM—Open Microphone for Additional Presentations and Discussion

4:00 PM—Adjourn

  • Kate Willett will also present a poster in the Regulation and Policy session, Wednesday, March 16, 1:15 PM to 4:45 PM: “Regulatory Acceptance of Non-standard Toxicological Methods through Increased use of Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessment (IATA)” (Abstract #3003/Poster #P143).

Corporate members and partners of HTPC will be presenting at SOT next week, as well.  Scientists from each of the member corporations are coauthors on the following posters:

alternative toxicity testing AOPs CAAT computational toxicology Dow EPA ExxonMobil HTPC members in the news HTPC partners L'Oreal P&G regulatory toxicology Tox21 ToxCast Unilever

Educational Infographic produced by the Human Toxicology Project Consortium

THE FUTURE OF TOXICITY TESTINGHTP_infographic_FINAL_revised

A new infographic produced by the Human Toxicology Project Consortium shows in three sections how the future of toxicity testing promises a steady reduction in testing costs, increases in human relevance and confidence in safety assessments, and the eventual elimination of animal tests.

The first section provides a snapshot comparison of the current and future costs, efficiency and efficacy of toxicity testing, while the mid portion uses pesticide testing as a specific example of now, vs near-future, vs the optimal approach that, given the focus and resources necessary, will be envisioned within the decade.

The near-future and optimal approaches rely increasingly on our understanding of biology and using it to build a predictive systems biology platform that is comprised of an interrelated network of biological pathways. This platform is used to design and interpret tests that provide much more efficient and effective characterization of chemical activity that can be used to predict safe use of chemicals.

Finally, the results of this progression are captured in the summary graphic at the end – decreasing costs, animal use and time while human relevance and our confidence in safety decisions continue to improve.

As explained on our Project page, the Human Toxicology Project Consortium works on three areas critical for the successful, international implementation of a pathways-based approach to chemical safety testing: advancing the science, communicating the purpose and goals of pathway-based toxicology, and lobbying for funding and policy changes that will support pathway-based approaches in the US and around the world.

To advance our communication and education efforts, HTPC member organizations worked together to create this infographic, to quickly and effectively illustrate the differences between traditional animal-based toxicity testing and pathway-based testing in terms of predictive power, cost, and testing capacity.

Details on the numbers used in this comparison are available here (PDF).

alternative toxicity testing AOPs computational toxicology databases drug discovery EPA HTPC members in the news non-animal tests non-predictive animal models pathway-based approaches regulatory toxicology ToxCast toxicity testing alternatives

Human Toxicology Project Consortium coordinator participates in a TSCA science briefing on Capital Hill

At a recent Capital Hill science briefing organized by the American Chemical Society (ACS) and the American Chemistry Council (ACC), Human Toxicology Project Consortium coordinator Kate Willett joined toxicologists from industry and the EPA to discuss how reforms to the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) can capitalize on scientific advances in non-animal test methods.  Participants explained how technologies such as high-throughput screening, organs-on-chips, and computational modeling will improve the relevance and efficiency of safety assessments, and produce crucial information more quickly. The Royal Society of Chemisty’s Chemistry World covered the briefing.

The experts gathered at the briefing agreed that tremendous advances had been made since the 1970s in understanding how chemicals can interact with biological systems – at the molecular, cellular and organ level. For example, high throughput screening now enables thousands of chemicals to be evaluated in a matter of hours or days….

Kate Willett, a toxicologist at the Humane Society of the US, noted that the critical goal of [TSCA] is to protect human health and the environment. This means a system is needed that can quickly identify potential problems and address them in the most time- and cost-effective way possible.

Willett stressed that any new TSCA reform measure must allow for “the continuing evolution of this science.” Therefore, she said the final updated law should require that all alternative approaches are used before moving to animal testing. “Reducing reliance on animal testing allows more chemicals to be more thoroughly assessed in the most efficient way possible – a win for environmental protection and the industry, and also for the animals that are used in this testing.”

The House and Senate have both passed TSCA reform bills (H.R. 2576 and S. 697) and now must reconcile differences between the two versions.

computational toxicology non-animal tests organs-on-chips regulatory toxicology ToxCast TSCA