Human Toxicology Project Consortium at the Society of Toxicology meeting in New Orleans

You’ll find the Human Toxicology Project Consortium at the Society of Toxicology’s annual meeting in New Orleans next week – in the ToxExpo center, poster sessions, workshops, and seminars.

  • Visit HTPC’s informational booth at ToxExpo, booth #1704.
  • HTPC is co-sponsoring a “hands-on” seminar, “Creating an Adverse Outcome Pathway in the AOP Wiki,” on Tuesday, March 15, from 5-7PM in the Hilton Riverside.  More details about the seminar can be found here.
  • HTPC is also once again co-sponsoring and presenting at the annual SOT Satellite Meeting, Updates on Activities Related to 21st Century Toxicology and Related Efforts: Invited Presentations and Open Microphone, on Thursday, March 17, 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Jefferson Ballroom. As always, this informative meeting features a number of invited presentations, and also allows time for an “open microphone” segment in which participants are welcome to give brief presentations on germane topics.

The draft program is as follows:

12:30 PM—Box Lunch (for pre-registered participants) and Welcome by Thomas Hartung, Johns Hopkins University

1:00 PM—Invited Speakers (10 minute presentations each followed by 5 minute of discussion)

ToxCast Update: Russell Thomas, US Environmental Protection Agency

EDSP21 Update: David Dix, US Environmental Protection Agency

Tox21 Update: Richard Paules, US National Toxicology Program

Hamner TT21C Update: Melvin Andersen, Hamner Institutes

NICEATM Update: Warren Casey, NICEATM

SEURAT/EU Tox-Risk Update: Michael Schwarz, University of Tuebingen

CAAT’s Read-Across Initiative and Human Toxome-Related Activity Update: Thomas Hartung, Johns Hopkins

Human Toxicology Project Consortium Update: Catherine Willett, HTPC

Evidence-Based Toxicology Update: Martin Stephens, Johns Hopkins

3:15 PM—Open Microphone for Additional Presentations and Discussion

4:00 PM—Adjourn

  • Kate Willett will also present a poster in the Regulation and Policy session, Wednesday, March 16, 1:15 PM to 4:45 PM: “Regulatory Acceptance of Non-standard Toxicological Methods through Increased use of Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessment (IATA)” (Abstract #3003/Poster #P143).

Corporate members and partners of HTPC will be presenting at SOT next week, as well.  Scientists from each of the member corporations are coauthors on the following posters:

alternative toxicity testing AOPs CAAT computational toxicology Dow EPA ExxonMobil HTPC members in the news HTPC partners L'Oreal P&G regulatory toxicology Tox21 ToxCast Unilever

China developing a roadmap to twenty-first century toxicity testing

At a special symposium last month in Xi’an, China, participants began to map China’s regulatory steps toward twenty-first century toxicology and away from animal testing.

The symposium, “TT21C/AOP China Roadmap,” was part of a conference on alternatives to animal tests in toxicology that was hosted by the Chinese Society of Toxicology’s Committee on Toxicological Alternatives and Translational Toxicology and the Chinese Environment Mutagen Society’s Committee on Toxicity Testing and Alternative Methods, and co-sponsored by the Humane Society International (HSI), Unilever, L’Oreal, and Shell. The symposium was convened “to address the need to increase Chinese regulatory uptake of currently available alternatives and the AOP paradigm.” Human Toxicology Project Consortium coordinator Dr. Catherine Willett was an invited speaker (a PDF of her presentation, “Use of Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) to Reduce Uncertainty and Animal Use in Chemical Hazard and Risk Assessment,” is available).

During the symposium, a working team comprised of members from the host societies and representatives from Unilever, L’Oreal, HSI, and others was established to begin working on the twenty-first century toxicology “roadmap.” Asked about the team’s next steps in a Chemical Watch article (subscription required) about the symposium, Dr. Carl Westmoreland (Director of Science and Technology at Unilever’s Safety and Environmental Assurance Centre, and a member of the working team) said the host committees will prepare a summary of the proceedings and circulate it to participants for review.

alternative toxicity testing AOPs HSI HTPC members in the news L'Oreal Meetings & Events pathway-based approaches Unilever

HTPC member Unilever partners with the EPA to develop non-animal approaches to safety testing

Human Toxicology Project Consortium member Unilever announced Tuesday that it will be collaborating with the US Environmental Protection Agency on a project that will improve and advance human-relevant chemical safety assessment while phasing out the use of animals.

The project will create case studies around chemicals of mutual interest, using existing data from the Toxcast and Tox21 programs combined with Unilever’s data and methods for estimating consumer exposures, and testing new high-throughput screening methods that account for metabolism and more completely assess human biological pathways.

Quoted in the joint press release, Russell Thomas, Director of EPA’s National Center for Computational Toxicology, said that if the project is successful, “research from this collaboration will result in better ways to evaluate the potential human health effects of new ingredients and chemicals we currently know little about. …These methods could be used by both industry and governmental agencies to reduce the costs associated with safety testing and accelerate the pace of chemical risk assessment.” And Julia Fentem, Vice President of Unilever’s Safety and Environmental Assurance Centre, said, “This research collaboration is strategically very important for Unilever’s long-held ambition to eliminate the need for any animal testing while also continuing to ensure the safety of consumers and our environment. If we had robust scientific tools to accurately and rapidly predict exposures to chemicals at the cellular and molecular levels within the human body, this would be a huge step forward in being able to conduct safety risk assessments without using animal data.”

alternative toxicity testing EPA HTPC members in the news non-animal tests pathway-based approaches Tox21 ToxCast Unilever